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into the story of what happened that day in afghanistan, may i just say, that hand is super cool. how did you... when i shook your hand, it curled around my hand with a stronger grip than i have. >> it's designed to conform to different objects that actually stops when each finger meets resistance to give you more dexterity. when i actually lost it, i thought i was going to have a hook, and i was fine with that because i lost it the way i wanted to, but they gave me this hand, and i got... it's amazing and it's getting better. >> jon: do you have one that can... let's say you're in traffic... [laughter] there's a problem. >> i use the good hand. >> jon: all right. fair enough. the story of what happened in afghanistan, it's an incredible one. would you mind if we just went through it briefly. >> sure. >> jon: you were on day mission. >> yes, sir. >> jon: and it was a raid. is that unusual to be on a day raid like that? >> for us it is unusual. >> jon: you're an army ranger. >> yeah, we don't normally do daylight raids, but the necessity to get out there and get this high value target and the
represented inside the halls corridor of power. afghanistan, you know, if we listened to president obama during the campaign, and i was one who said that,ing you know, progressives need to be tough and pragmatic about president obama as he is about us, he spoke about afghanistan as the good war, and he did that because he needed to show because of the national security state grip on our politics, until we find a way to end that, a president remains captive to a large extent. he had to show he was tough. i think now what's going on in this country is you have the ability, polls are snapshots, but on a number of core issues, afghanistan, corporate powers and others, there's majorities of people who want a way out of afghanistan, who believe corporate power is too strong in this country, and a president with leadership could seize that. it's not too late, and find a way to build politics around that. thinking of president johnson, wars kill, reform presidencies. president obama is a reform, maybe deluded, too limited, but in these areas, a reform president. it's imperative now for citizens,
and wearing for brain injuries. >> these are lessons we are learning on the battlefields of afghanistan and iraq. it can be translated to civilian care. >> this lieutenant colonel is a flight surgeon. >> expect to be a jack of all trades. we are not deployed and i'm an outpatient internal medicine guy. >> before getting to afghanistan, he says, this will help him learn to prioritize multiple critical patients under battlefield conditions and sharpen his ability to make rapid decisions. >> i expect to see gunshot wounds. i expect to see traumatic brain injuries from explosive devices. it means burns as well. a lot of orthopedic injuries and really some horrific stuff. what i'm doing here is getting exposure to the things i will be seeing over there. it is an immersion in a high-volume trauma center. >> you may not realize it, but treating the war wounded has long before a source of knowledge for all doctors. >> there has been a century long interplay with the civilian and military care. in many ways, trauma surgeons have learned from military conflict than any other component of care. >>
bombings, soldiers killed in afghanistan and iraq and other child victims. law enforcement are investigating a host of allegations including news of the world employees tried to bribe police for investigation on potentially news worthy stories. on friday, rebecca brooks, the chief executive of newscorp's newspaper unit, news international which publishes the times and the sun, resigned, saying, as chief executive of the company i feel a deep sense of responsibility for the people we've hurt and sorry for what we now know to have taken place. newscorp is the parents company of fox news channel. the chase involving the 13-year-old girl that got the investigation rolling or people steamed. >> i agree, it was outrageous p and the way you detailed it there, the family had false hope. whatever criminality might be there, it's incredibly immoral and the people who did it shouldn't be called journalists. >> jon: there's a full page apology from rupert murdoch, reading we are sorry and the news of the world was in the business of holding others to account, it failed when it comes to
and afghanistan lie buried. nikki bunting brings her sons connor and cooper here every sunday. >> section 60 is very unique. it's not like any other cemetery you'll ever see. this specific section. there's so many young people, young kids so we kind of try to keep it a joyous place. >> reporter: her husband brian's headstone, like so many in section 60, marks a life cut short, a young family torn apart. but two-year-old cooper is proof life is stronger than death. i'm doing the math on cooper. explain that to me. >> he was our little r&r baby. he's the spitting image of my husband. it's really nice. >> reporter: brian was home on a so-called rest and recreation tour in february of 2009. shortly after he returned to afghanistan, he and three others were killed by a roadside bomber. >> at the time he was killed we didn't know that we were pregnant. so four days after i was notified of his death is when i found out that we were pregnant, so it was just such a miracle. it was the best news i could have ever received. >> reporter: cooper actually took his first step at his father's grave. >> righ
for the communities of pakistan and afghanistan. >> i came back to america, i was broke after k 2. i had to raise 12 thousand dollars. and i didn't know how a clue of how to raise money like that. i went to the local library. any librarians here? let's give them a big hand. [applause] so, i went to the library, i talked to the librarian we looked up 580 cell rities and sports heroes. over 3 months i hand typed 580 letters and wrote dollar michael jordan and dear mr. stalone. guess what happened? nothing. at christmas i got a check from tom brocaw for a hundred dollars. i sold my car a buick for 500 dollars in a seedy area in oakland. by spring i raised 200 dollars. my marth was a principal at an elementary school. she invited me to talk to the kids. when i was leaving a fourth grader looked me in the eye and said, i have a piggy bank at home and i will help you raise money for the school in pakistan. i didn't think anything of it. 6 weeks later the school is raised 65,000 penes. >> main stage's loud efts performance was about bief the detroit native high strung. they had an energyic performance. th
are preserving u.s. military powers, stabilizing afghanistan, and forging a real and lasting partnership with iraq. panetta replaces robert gates who retired after power decades in public service. and a ceremony marking his retirement president obama surprised gates by awarding him the presidential medal of freedom. prince william and his wife, katheri catherine, continue their tour of canada. the duke and duchess are keeping busy traveling throughout the country and meeting with politicians. military members and hospital patients and even local homeless youth. the royal couple are also finding time for fun with cooking lessons and drag ever dragon boat races. after they wrap up their tour they head to california for three days. >> reporter: we see doctors on medical shows all the time, but is real life like it is on tv? i'm getting the chance to find out! it's shortly after sunrise at long island college hospital in brooklyn, where i'll spend the day shadowing one of their top doctors. hello, it's nice to meet you. i'm nicole. >> i'm dr. millicent comrie. >> reporter: all right, so let'
in afghanistan, after the murder of his half brother this week, the afghan brother hamid karzai, overcome with grief, climbed in his own brother's freshly dug grave, sobbing uncontrollably. >>> this week marked the 100th anniversary of the time when a guy landed a plane on the white house lawn, something they frown upon these days. >>> chicagoans this week have someone new to look up to. the massive marilyn monroe. it's the work of the famous sculptor sue ber sewer johnson. >>> and we lost a voice this week that reminded a lot of us of the good old days. ♪ i'm going to tell the world that i love you ♪ >> while way too many teenagers sang it erroneously on the car radio, the vocalist was rob grill of the grass roots. he died this week at the age of 67. less well known, the fact that the lead guitarist on that song was creed bratton, the guy who plays creed on "the office" on nbc. and that was a surprise to a lot of people in our office at nbc. so we all learned something this week. >>> and that ends the week on a friday night in new york. thank you for being here with us for all of it.
/11 what we have spent on the wars in afghanistan is close to $12 trillion. $275 million per day, every single day for 10 years. the total amount we have been spending annually in programs to better gauge the american people, to work with law enforcement or public safety, roughly 75 minutes. not to say that we will not spend what we can as a nation, investing in these things. but are we investing enough in this great asset that we have? dealing with the dangers that confront us? the fact is the terrorist threat has fundamentally changed over the last 10 years. the current and now the parting national terrorism director highlighted this as well. terrorists have essentially gone into smaller operations with increasingly homegrown dimensions, operating as lone wolves within two's and threes. central al qaeda, with the death of osama bin laden, is not able to orchestrate the large-scale conspiracies that we saw on 9/11, but it does mean that terrorism is more likely to come out smaller homes. without sophisticated conspiracies, you do not have the smoke signals and tripwires that help you o
over here, the possible hacking of phones of families who lost soldiers in afghanistan and iraq, british families, it takes my breath away. >> if indeed the executives are found guilty of involvement in any of these things, what are the sanctions that you could impose on your side of the atlantic? >> right now, many things. there are two laws that come into play. this is a public corporation. they sell shares. if they hid payments, bribery payments, from shareholders, that is a whole other civil penalty. if they hacked into phones without a warrant, that is criminal. the foreign corrupt practices act could be civil or criminal. lots could happen. and the security and exchange commission has the ability to take away the license from a media corporation that breaks the law. it is too soon to say what, where and how. >> is not one criticism, of course, that it would actually sue to the democrats -- suit the democrats greatly if the fox news channel was to become emasculated. >> my goodness. if you break the law in our country, whether you are republican, democrat, liberal, conserva
military are. these members returned from afghanistan just last year. after this deployment within a few months time they'll be prepared to get it back there again. there is the greatest strain on the military and with the threat of yet more defense cuts, this is a remainder of why it's still needed. >> this is proving what we can still do as opposed to what we might not be able to do is the key message. but we are still in the business of being able to operate in this would to do this kind of thing. >> but for those left shouldering the burden of the nation undiminished gobal ambitions, the question remains how can you do more with land? >> if we are anything else, would be we struggle. but at the moment we're supposed to be in syria, yemen, libya. if we're supposed to be in those places, we're struggling, definitely. >> the task will only get harder. a be it at the heart of this deployment and currently the royal navy's flagship is due to be moth balled as soon as she returns back home. jonathan biel, "bbc news." >> less than 24 hours after uncovering the country's largest marijuana pl
-age villages in afghanistan, fly them halfway across the world and drop them into an extra governmental space, neither american nor the battlefield. herein using unchecked executive power in an act of blistering self-critical texturalization, not to mention some of those guys look like they got wrapped up by cristo. so i say, forget marine abromovich, forget lori anderson, the greatest performance artists of our generation are these two guys. we'll be right back. [applause] [cheering and applause] >> stephen: welcome back, everybody. my guest tonight is a pulitzer prize winning journalist who recently admitted he's an illegal immigrant, so i will pay him half of the nothing i pay my guests. please welcome jose antonio vargas. [cheering and applause] hey. mr. vargas, thanks so much for coming on. all right, sir. you are a journalist, true? >> yes, yes, i am. >> stephen: san francisco chronicle, new yorker, washington post, part of the post's pulitzer prize winning tea party for coverage of the virginia tech massacre, and in june you wrote an essay for the "times" magazine entitled "my life as
was sent there in 2005, in afghanistan. i found out later that he's hiding in pakistan. we need to support our military, our families and don't forget our gold star, honor and remember. >> agree with you 100%. you know how we can support them even more? is there any money wasted? you walk down this building. i believe in education. you know my background. i don't come from wealth. i came from a small school, put my own way through. i started a company, my own job at 19. i took the risk. >> are you saying the military is wealthy? >> no. listen to my point. you go down to the department of education building, the average salary there is over $100,000. what if that money was sent to the classroom instead of down the street? you agree? so how much money is spent in that pentagon and not on the frontline? >> exactly. >> that is what i'm talking about. eliminate that. more importantly, i live in california, okay. i see companies everyday leave my state because of my taxes. there's 37 million people in my state, 12% of the nation. 32% of the nation's welfare lives in my state. 25% of the budget f
at the borders, ports, afghanistan, iraq, police, and our departments by harnessing that american spirit so that we can become a more resilient nation. we are going to be dealing with this sort of threat for the perceivable future, for a couple of generations. you have summed it up very well. we need to confront the risk and overcome it. the executive committee in committee leaders will need to establish overarching policy for the national governors association. following that meeting, the committee will begin work to consolidate, revise, and align our policies for the priorities set by the executive committee. it is our hope that we will be but to build a consensus around key principles, like resilience, that can guide our advocacy efforts and better inform not only our federal lawmakers of the issues but do a better job of informing our citizens of the things that we can do as a free people to make our homeland more secure. the executive committee, we have agreed to allow all policies up for consideration for new policies and process, whatever that means, and we will discuss it at that ti
in the attacks in afghanistan or to bring that message home, you need us i >>dave: and how big a concern is an attack in the united states on the 10th anniversary? >>guest: this is the first anniversary a sense of celebration and resolution and every member of al qaeda is going to want to spoil that. so you will have home green terrorists that will look at that date. >>dave: so all eyes on that date and that will be our tightest secured date so a difficult day to pull anything off? >>guest: it is possible but there are so many soft targets and the bar is so low for al qaeda because they have not pulled off another september 11th it does not have to be in new york city. >>dave: ryan, thank you for being here. millions of americans are locking for america but how can you separate yourself from the field? why who you know could be more important than what you know. giving them a new choice. we'll deliver better service, with thousands of new cell sites... f greater access to all the things you want, whenever you want them. it's the at&t network... and what's possible in here is almost impos
in afghanistan via youtube. but now her buddy justin timberlake has gotten his own youtube offer. a network of possibilities. in here, the planned combination of at&t and t-mobile would deliver our next generation mobile broadband experience to 55 million more americans, many in small towns and rural communities, giving them a new choice. we'll deliver better service, with thousands of new cell sites... for greater access to all the things you want, whenever you want them. it's the at&t network... and what's possible in here is almost impossible to say. that's how it is with alzheimer's disease. she needs help from me. and her medication. the exelon patch -- it releases medication continuously for twenty-four hours. she uses one exelon patch daily for the treatment of mild to moderate alzheimer's symptoms. [ female announcer ] it cannot change the course of the disease. hospitalization and rarely death have been reported in patients who wore more than one patch at a time. the most common side effects of exelon patch are nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. the likelihood and severity of these si
coast, heroin doesn't come from afghanistan or southeast asia anymore. >> you're holding $2 million worth of heroin in my hand. >> now it's coming from the place made famous by cocaine and pure enough to kill. >> that one time that somebody makes a decision to use it, it's like playing russian roulette with your life. >> it's big business coming into the country hidden in unbelievable ways. what's the strangest thing you've seen in heroin smuggling? >> it has to be the liquid heroin inside the puppies. >> and a controversial heroin overdose antidote. you'll see it bring a user back from the edge of death. >> there he is. back from the dead. >> heroin, a deadly drug and a business that is still flourishing and recruiting new customers every day. our kids. >> i watched two of my friends die from it. >> the parents like to say it's not happening so we close our eyes and kids continue to die. >> heroin is one of the most addictive drugs known. it's cheap. it's easy to get. once a user is hooked, it can be for life. for the drug traffickers who deal in it, it's a hugely profitable busine
medal. they were honored for rescuing a french helicopter crew in afghanistan last month after the french helicopter had crashed in bad weather. the captain guided that rescue mission. >>> performers are combining the death defying acts of aerial acrobatics with fire eating in oakland. members of the circus troop lit up the stage. the show headlines the annual fire art festival. the three-act play is loosely based on dante's inferno. it plays near the west oakland bart station. >> that's spectacular. >> yeah, larry will be moonlighting. >> my next job will be as a fire knife dancer. i have been singed a few times. >> it looks pretty tricky. >> it is tough. fire equals hot. >> the giants enjoy their home away from home down south. and the british open highlights are featuring the best -- oh, let's stretch it out. sports is next. beth! hi. looking good! you've lost some weight. thanks! you noticed! you know these clothes are too big now, so i'm donating them. nogoing back the again. good for you! how'd you do i eating right, whole grain. whole grain? whole grain. [ female announc
. one of the things that we are involved in his capacity building. we have officers in afghanistan, iraq, several others able to train and a buildup that capacity. if we are not doing enough, please get me the information. we are very interested in that type of build up, capacity building, so that it will help with your homeland and hours also. we are very much interested in that. on the invasive nista to talk about, anything that we do within dhs, we have an entity called civil rights, civil liberties. it reviews every activity that we undertake, that we are planning to undertake, and that we are looking to move toward so that when we do take action, we take into account the civil rights in civil liberties that are of the highest interests of all of us who have historically worked this type of effort. the amount of equipment out there is tremendous. it helps dramatically. we are very sensitive to that and base of this and want to make sure that we get the job done, making sure that the rights and liberties of our citizens are not in pain is. >> first of all, thank-you. we wish you the b
by democracy in iraq, if you will, in afghanistan, if you will, but here we are at this time trying to restrict the number of days, voting more expensive. this is the part of the anti-barack obama mainland that's sweeping the country. these are the people that raised the debt limit 19 times for all of america because this is not about raising the debt limit. this is about, in fact, another way to undermine the president. we as a people, as a nation, ought to fight back. >> reverend jesse jackson. sir, happy and honored to have you on the show tonight. thank you very much. >>> rupert murdoch's giant media empire is in huge trouble you may have heard. fox news channel is part of that giant media empire. fox news channel covering the scandal, it's amazing. from sprint. its powerful tools help you work faster and smarter so you can get back to playing "angry birds." it lets you access business forms on the go, fire off e-mails with the qwerty keypad, and work securely around the world so you can get back to playing "angry birds." it's the android-powered phone that mixes business with pleasure. so
iraq and afghanistan but we have a half a million troops on bases. >> how many do chinese have? >> none, i don't think. >> may have hardly anything, they have no imperialistic ambition. >> this is not the way you achieve it in this world. not the 14th century. >> i was in shanghai. this dinism you felt. this young millionaire, 125,000 millionaires in shanghai. he said, i don't want to kill you, i don't want to take over your land, i want to sell you a duvet. he laughed. he said we want to be number one in selling you duvets, i want to sell you everything in your home. i don't want to kill you. >> that's how they will be number one. they are building $300 billion of high speed rail. this country trying to get the money to build, i think it's $8 billion. they wanted to lay it between l.a. and las vegas, which i think is funny those are the two cities that have to be connected or maybe l.a. and san francisco. we have none at the moment. >> we'll have a little break. when we come back, i want to ask you, which of these two people do you think has the best chance of putting america back on i
territories or in afghanistan. and there's the mother apology hattie. he wrote the first book on global jihad. what the names of global jihad ways. and now it's also kind of interesting to me because there have been many, many books about 10 minutes writing writings and biographies and everything. but none of them mentioned margaret marcus amerian jameel. none of them talk about him as a father or it has been for a brother or son. marion's letters were all about his household and the way it was run. there seemed to be of benefit instead of looking at this man is this powerful political leader, which is how the academic scholars have written about him was to look at the politics of his household, which were much more complicated and unexpected than you would as soon, given his writings. i mean, miriam would be upset because his wife didn't always coming in now, wasn't always an instant purdah. she would say, why didn't you wear your veil to meet her brother and not quite she said, doesn't your husband get upset at that? she said you know, my husband is such a saint. he is so much patience for
in afghanistan and iraq? ron jeremy is there. the lead singing group was leonard skin nerd. so ron jeremy is the guest. somebody said will you take a picture with ron jeremy? i walk back stage and there he is. i thought, hold it! do you have any idea who that is? i said, 15,000 x-rated movies. i literally had to take ron outside and say i am a big fan and you know each other and you cants do it with this guy. you will ruin his career. but i can take a picture with him. >> you worked -- it was like the first talk show with tony snow, right? >> the first one on fox cable. it was called off the record. they won an emmy when they took us off the air. but we followed "cops" and before" america's most wanted" so we didn't have the lead in we needed. >> but didn't tony help you a lot? >> he was great. he was one of the things -- this is sad. i love him. we gave a speech once and we had to fly overnight to get there. i was so hung over and i thought it was date before and it was the day after. tony went and wrote my speech including the shots i gave him. it was better than what i told him i miss
of the 777 subway bombings, families of soldiers killed in afghanistan and possibly 9/11 victims. as a result of the scandal, "news of the world" was shut down after last sunday's edition was printed. 200 people lost their jobs but rebecca brooks the woman who ran the paper at the time, milly dowler's phone was hacked was still employed at the head of rupert murdock british newspapers there was public pressure on her to go. today she went. in a statement, brooks said as chief executive of the company i feel a deep sense of responsibility for the people we have hurt. i want to reiterate how sorry i am for what we now know to have taken place." the latest resignation comes from dow jones ceo les hinton a long time news corp executive who ran the british newspaper group in much of the time of the hacking. murdock said he accepted the resignation with a heavy heart saying few people had given more to the cane than les hinton in london, amy kellogg, fox news. >> bret: more on this story with the panel. the astronauts aboard the space station got up a little earlier than they planned today. a bit l
to our honor roll of american service personnel killed in the iraq and afghanistan conflicts. we add them as their deaths are made official and photographs become available. here, in silence, are nine more. >> suarez: and that's the "newshour" for tonight. on our web site, we preview our upcoming series from indonesia. our first two stories are already posted including the one we'll air monday here on the broadcast. it captures the sometimes cruel treatment for mentally ill patients locked in cages and restrained with chains. find that and more at newshour.pbs.org. i'm ray suarez. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. "washington week" can be seen later this evening on most pbs stations. we'll see you online and again here monday evening. have a nice weekend. thank you and good night. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible
am attending. that's what she says. sergeant moore is stationed over in afghanistan and he asked kunis to attend the ball in a youtube video. interesting stuff. >> a big fan of her. i met her. she's great. that's cool that she's going. >> time now for the ridiculist. tonight we have to add all the romance haters out there who continue to doubt the love between these two folks, doug hutchison and courtney today den. perhaps you've seen him in "the green mile" or "lost" or "the x file" and his bride 16-year-old courtney. you might have seen her relaxing on the beach wearing the american flag perhaps. or perhaps sick singing in a boat with a dog that match her bikini. ♪ when i go shopping i say popping when i'm a walking they'll be talking ♪ >> yeah. she's 16. kids today. so yes, there is a 35 year age difference. no, courtney hasn't graduated from high school yet. and yes, many have criticized their union. but the happy couple were on good morning america today explaining their relationship putting all skepticism to rest. it is a classic love story really, 53-year-old boy meets
like we have defense or military professionals in afghanistan. we have to have security professionals and this whole thing is all about show. so, put somebody at the top of the list, security credentials all the way down and the people involved with security credentials and it's more than looking for toothpicks. >> jamie: i understand and shepard and i were talking about not being able to bring his shampoo on the plane and touching you in the patdowns and getting ridiculous, but are you saying when our military returns, they would be an option. do air marshals work? do we need more. >> no, we have professionals running our military. we need professionals in security running the security system. >> jamie: trained by who? >> trained by the government. number one we have to have people who understand security procedures. reality is putting somebody in charge who used to run a railroad like we had in the last tsa administration does not work. what we have to have, what are the objectives? what happens, how do you mitigate a threat when it happens? we have no mitigation plans. no idea what
's what timberlake told his co-star, mila kunis, after a male marine stationed in afghanistan tilted his shades and asked mila out via youtube. >> hey, mila, sergeant moore, but you can call me scott. >> what? >> i just want to take a moment out of my day to invite you to the marine corps ball on november 18 in greenville, north carolina, with yours truly. so take a second, think about it. get back to you. >> reporter: now chances are the last time mila kunis was asked out on a semi blind date was when cnn's own wolf blitzer invited her to the white house correspondents dinner -- >> this is my date, wolf! >> reporter: and though wolf is more famous than sergeant scott moore, the sergeant had justin timberlake on his side during a fox news interview. >> this needs to go down. this needs to happen. >> okay. >> do it for your country -- >> i'll do it for you. >> reporter: yeah, you do it for your country, justin timberlake. now marine wants you. >> justin, you want to call out my girl, mila? well, i'm going to call you out and ask you to come to the marine corps ball with me on november 12,
in afghanistan, was also mentioned in the bin laden documents as a potential target to be shot down while he traveled in the war zone. a spokesman for petraeus declined to comment. the focus now for panetta is to keep attacking al qaeda in pakistan, yemen and somalia. >> now is the moment following what happened with bin laden to put maximum pressure on him. because i do believe that if we continue this effort that we can really cripple al qaeda, as a threat to this country. >> the u.s. believes al qaeda remains focused on high-profile attacks and would like nothing better than to bring down a u.s. aircraft. bin laden even wrote about assembling a team of operatives to attack the u.s. homeland. but he was killed by those u.s. navy s.e.a.l.s before any of his plots and plans could go any further. barbara starr, cnn, the pentagon. >>> all right. one game, folks, one game and you're world cup champions. that is the mission of the u.s. women's soccer team tomorrow. but they have to go through japan. even if it means they have to listen to a little bit of this. ♪ slow down, you move to fast ♪
defense gold medal. they with honored for rescuing a french helicopter crew in afghanistan last month after the french helicopter crashed in bad weather. captain mosier guided that mission. >>> and soldier from san francisco got home come he deserved today after so many years. eduardo tool died in germany during world war ii but he has been missing in action ever since. today o'toole welcomed home by veteran group. vick lee takened the service. if [ taps] officials heavy mist with gray if feel over the schlts he came home 66 years after killed in world war ii. he was identified through his dog tag and dental records. newspaper obit said o'toole had no surviving family members. that struck a chord with pat fichlt read it in the paper. and i thought there's no way i'm going to let him be buried with no one here. >>reporter: so she called her other friends. friends lake mag. >> when pat mentioned it at lunch i said i want to go. >>reporter: in fact she wore the navy necklace her dad gave her mom at the end of world war ii. >> just felt appropriate to wear it and be here. >>reporter
. and we're fighting these wars, three, $4 billion a week now in iraq, afghanistan. >> i speak out against the size of u.s. military budget. we're spending like 17 times as much as the next two biggest countries, russia and china, and i think it's crazy we have troops in 65 countries and bases all over the world. what do we think we are, the british empire to images ago? we don't make any money off that. and they do better without us there. the last war we won was against japan. [applause] >> okay, peter? i mean, it is true. you do speak out on it, but a lot of corporate executives, even when they are retired, not just corporate executives, congressman and centers, not wondering the last election that i cannot remember one except maybe the one from ohio. >> kucinich. thatcher hosted. they're both from ohio spent his name is hard to pronounce. but i think he was the only one that spoke out against the size of the military budget. nobody spoke out against it. it's true, the military-industrial complex like eisenhower warned us years ago has taken over the country basically spent not just the
study that found that the cost of the war -- that cumulative cost of the wars in iraq and afghanistan will but did up to -- it will be up to $4.2 trillion. i think it is a very taft common -- apt comment. he said that there may be odd tricks ready to go. what will act on the fiscal side, when we had the stimulus package, we at $800 billion. and it was a scramble of what to do with the money. why is it that the fiscal authority what do not have a well thought out plan in place that if we hit this level of project -- unemployment, we have these projects ready. the economy would be much more about -- able to rebound. the stimulus, that was not just handouts. these were funds for projects. there's some projects that are short term, but on the infrastructure side, these are certainly large enough -- coda new york city and spend a few days there. you confided up potholes' that need fixing, which employ a lot of people. host: this is from london of twitter. -- linda a look twitter. guest: that speaks to the declining standard of living that we have in the unemployment market where people tak
and afghanistan, or raising the debt ceiling. i grant that, but we are talking about something that is profoundly troubling and disturbing. for millions of americans, it is also a necessary. i mean, i thought what we were meant to do is try to clear up problems here. 10 years ago, the telephone industry said they will clear up the problems because they make us look bad if we do not, therefore you could trust us to do it, and they did not. all i am saying is we are going to stick with this. the sec stated yesterday that they are seeking comment on whether a band third party billing -- banned third-party billing -- they have settlements, the ftc, but that this stuff that is already done, and that is an admission of guilt. i am not a lawyer, but that is the way i read it. anyway, in the near future, i plan to introduce, working with colleagues from both sides of the aisle, legislation that will put a side -- stop to this because i simply cannot find any grain of sense in us having to have a hearing like this. and and, to have -- and to have all of you, you have not gone off of the -- gotten out of t
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